Reimagerepair Exe Review

Reimagerepair Exe Review

Conclusion Reimage Repair is a tool that has become more visible over the years due to its increased popularity. As a result of its new found patronage, more and more people are trying to authenticate the legitimacy of this program before they install and run it on their computers. Questions such as: What is Reimage Repair? How does it Work?
reimagerepair exe review

How to remove the PC Repair virus

Reimagerepair Exe Review

Only software of its kind. Can turn up disturbing but ultimately harmless glitches. When you use it to repair your system, it phones home to its huge repository of Windows files, and downloads and replaces or installs any Windows files that are damaged or missing from your system. In effect, it reinstalls Windows “in place”—without making you reinstall all your application software.

It sounds like an ideal solution to problems that start to afflict almost every Windows system that’s more than a few hours old—and for many users, it may the best available solution for recalcitrant Windows problems.

But before you use it, keep in mind that it only replaces files that are part of your Windows system itself—not files that are part of Microsoft Office or any other vendor’s software.

If Windows is acting up because of something that’s gone wrong in Windows itself, then Reimage may be your best shot at making it behave. But if Windows is acting up because third-party software—or Microsoft application software—is causing problems, Reimage won’t fix it.

The current software is a hair better than the version we tested last year, but expect some problems to arise. License and Guarantee If your great-uncle’s system is acting up and you can’t figure out why, then you might want to tell him to visit Reimage.

Reimage promises a money-back guarantee if its service doesn’t repair Windows, but you might want to stay on the phone with your great-uncle to help him navigate any glitches of the kind I encountered, and you might want to think twice before spending that sum on your own system.

It eventually performed as advertised, but it gave me a series of headaches while it did. Read on for the details. After Reimage was done performing its repairs, I was slightly dismayed to find that it had put back on my Start Menu all the useless links that I had carefully removed when I first installed Windows, and which I now had to spend a lot of time removing once again.

To avoid disappointment before using Reimage, it helps to be clear on exactly what it does. When you launch its free scanner—after downloading it from its website—it performs a quick virus-scan on your system, tests for problems in the Windows registry, and checks for missing or damaged Windows files. It also reports on the brand name of your motherboard and video card and other information that it doesn’t seem to use for any purpose.

It also reads Windows’ crash logs and reports obvious problems, like too little available disk space—something that Windows warns you about anyway—and whether it thinks you’re running Windows on too little memory. This initial scan takes about five minutes or less. If Windows’s crash logs indicate that the problems you’re having are with software that Reimage can’t repair, the program will tell you, so you won’t waste time and money asking it to repair something it can’t fix.

Some of the information in Reimage’s initial no-charge report suggested that the program had figured out more details that it really had. For example, on the best-maintained of my three test systems, Reimage reported that my third-party backup software had crashed recently, but that the problem was “repairable in most cases” by repairing built-in Windows components.

In fact, there was nothing wrong with my backup software. The software crash that Reimage had detected had occurred when I deliberately terminated the backup software because it had encountered a physical problem in a backup disk—and so any attempt to “repair” the surrounding Windows components would have been a waste of time and money.

Fortunately, after testing this system, Reimage told me that it hadn’t found any serious problems, and that if the system was having problems that Reimage hadn’t detected, I could tell it to go ahead and repair the system anyway, with a money-back guarantee if the repair didn’t work.

I skipped the repair on that system. Down-dating On two other systems—real-world systems that had been heavily used for more than a year by members of my family—Reimage found other crashes that probably had nothing to do with operating system-level problems, such as Firefox crashes that had probably been fixed by Firefox updates.

On those systems, Reimage suggested that I use it to repair my system, and I let it proceed to do so.

The whole process took between 30 minutes and an hour on those tries when it completed successfully , and required two or three reboots to allow Reimage to modify files that are in use when Windows is running normally. It was during those repair processes that my headaches began. On a Windows 7 system, Reimage downloaded more than replacement Windows files, and restored a batch of Start Menu items that I had carefully removed.

When Reimage was finished, Windows Update re-downloaded about 40 updates that I had installed earlier, because—as a Reimage representative explained—Reimage’s database of Windows files needs some time to catch up with Windows updates, so Reimage may actually “down-date” your most recent updates. This undoing and redoing of my most recent updates didn’t seem to cause any harm, but I wasn’t entirely happy about it, because I had no way of knowing whether the “down-dated” files would work correctly with third-party software that I started to use before Windows Update gets a chance to update my system again.

Remember that Windows Update updates your Microsoft Office and other Microsoft application software—but Reimage only works with operating system files, so it’s at least possible for a mismatch to occur after Reimage replaces new operating system files with older ones. It’s also unclear how many of the hundreds of “replaced” files were actually “down-dates” that Windows immediately un-replaced by updating them to the current versions.

Reimage doesn’t make it easy to figure out exactly what it did during a repair. It lets you click a link in the program window to display a list of files that it replaced or restored, but it doesn’t tell you which files replaced ones already on disk, and which ones were newly downloaded to your system—perhaps putting back files that you had deliberately removed.

Also, the window that displays the list doesn’t let you search it or save it to any standard document format. The window also lacks a menu from which you can print out the list, but expert users will remember that Ctrl-P brings up a print menu in any Windows application, a key-combination that also works here.

If you’re really expert, you can find the XML file that Reimage uses to display the list of replaced files, and open it in some other program that lets you search the list, but you’ll have to figure out how to do this by yourself. Reimage started up smoothly enough, then told me that I had to restart in Safe Mode to continue the repair—and gave me a button to press to perform the restart.

I understood that Reimage needed to modify files that it couldn’t modify when Windows was running normally, so I pushed the button to restart.

Unfortunately, when the machine rebooted in Safe Mode, Reimage automatically launched itself, ran for a few seconds, and then crashed and disappeared from the screen.

If I were testing my working system—or if my great-uncle were using the program—this would be very worrying, but it didn’t inspire confidence even when working with a test system. The same problem kept happening repeatedly until I got in touch with a Reimage representative, who told me that I should 1 turn off my anti-virus before running Reimage, and 2 ignore the warning to restart in Safe Mode.

So I did as I was told, and this time Reimage was able to continue, though I didn’t like the idea of turning off anti-virus protection while my computer was connected to the Internet. Unfortunately, Reimage needs to be connected to the Internet in order to consult its database of Windows files; you can’t use it without a connection.

That means, of course, that it can’t restore a system with a broken network driver that prevents you from accessing the Internet at all—a fairly common problem.

Even with a working Internet connection I found that Reimage’s server isn’t percent reliable. At one point in my testing, when Reimage started up, it ran for a minute or two then stopped—and its window displayed the same error message that Internet Explorer shows when it can’t find a remote site.

Apparently, Reimage’s server was down, and so the program couldn’t connect with it—but it didn’t display an error message explaining the problem, only the standard Internet Explorer “site not found” message. If this had been my main system, I would have been very worried at this point.

I tried running Reimage again a few times over the next hour, but the problem persisted, so I gave up and went to sleep. The next morning, I started the program again, and this time the Reimage server was working, and it continued its repairs to the end.

Once again, I had to wait while Windows Update downloaded updates to a few dozen files that Reimage had “down-dated,” and once again, I spent some time undoing the changes that Reimage had made to my Start Menu, but the process completed successfully, and Reimage told me that it had restored or replaced hundreds of Windows files.

A Reimage representative told me that a recent change in Symantec Antivirus had probably caused the initial problems with Safe Mode and system crashes, and that the normal procedure with this kind of problem is to set up a remote session to the user’s machine so the company’s technical support team can run the software for the user. Another safety net is a built-in Undo feature that’s available when you uninstall the software, and which you are obliged to use if you ask for a refund.

I didn’t experiment with the Undo feature, but if you plan to use it: Use it as soon as possible after running a Reimage repair, because anything that mixes file versions on your system is inherently risky. I’m willing to believe that I had some exceptional bad luck with it, and even with that bad luck, Reimage eventually completed its job.

I don’t know of any other software that even attempts those tasks. No other software even tries to rebuild a broken Windows system without requiring you to reinstall your applications—and if that’s the task you want to perform, then Reimage is the only choice. Just keep the aspirin handy. More Software Utility Reviews:

Reader Interactions

bzfomg.me is not essential for Windows 10/8/7/XP and will often cause is 45% dangerous, but you should also take into account the user reviews. Reimage Repair Plus will scan Windows PC for problems & repair & fix online operating system errors. Is it safe or is it a virus. Read reviews to. Reimage repair is a virus. “Louis Peter” and most of the web sites that tell you how to remove it are the ones who created the virus. Don’t download their software.

Reimage License Key (Reimage PC repair)- Updated 2018

The software is useful, but it promotes itself too aggressively Reimage commonly known as Reimage Repair is a computer repair software that can diagnose problems on your computer and fix them immediately. It can remove spyware and malware and reverse the damage done to your Windows system files using files from its database. To put it simply, Reimage covers three main areas — hardware, security and stability to keep your computer at its peak performance. Reimage offers software for Windows computer users, although it provides solutions for Mac and mobile users as well.

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Step 2: These malicious intruders can damage, corrupt, or even delete EXE-related files.

REVIEW: Reimage recensie, gratis download

Reimage-Repair-Review Reimage Repair uses strong marketing campaigns to promote itself . It should be called bzfomg.me bzfomg.me is not essential for Windows 10/8/7/XP and will often cause is 45% dangerous, but you should also take into account the user reviews. Reimage Repair is a program developed by Reimage. bzfomg.me – Reimage Safe Mode; bzfomg.me – Reimage ActiveX (Reimage Engine).

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Reimagerepair Exe Review

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